Weekly Torah Commentary – Pesach March 30, 2018

The Passover festival begins at sundown this Friday, March 30 and continues for the next seven days.  As it coincides this year with Shabbat, the readings for Passover take the place of the normal Shabbat schedule of readings.

Torah reading: Exodus 12: 21-51

Haftorah reading:  Joshua 3:5-7, 5:2 – 6:1, 6:27

SederPlate

Passover is our festival of freedom, liberation, deliverance and release. We became free people, no longer enslaved to our Egyptian masters.  We celebrate it with enthusiasm and joy and remind ourselves and our families that spiritual freedom is not a matter of geography but of inner liberation, something that every human being needs.  All manner of things can enslave us: fear, worry, addictions, relationships and more but Pesach proclaims that freedom is available!

Being enslaved is a two-edged sword. There is the physical circumstance of slavery—the torturous existence of being subjected daily to the merciless demands of a tyrannical superior. But internal psychological slavery is far worse.  It binds up and at times paralyzes its victim mentally and emotionally.

The word for Egypt in Hebrew is Mitzrayim. It means limitations, which we all have to certain degrees. For some, that may mean severe financial problems; for others, it could be serious health challenges. And for still others, it may be the burden of an abusive psychological environment. These are circumstances that can make us feel like slaves or prisoners.

But what about our internal shackles?  Though we may have experienced freedom from certain things that held us bound in the past, perhaps there are still others which trouble us; things like fear of what other people think, traumatic events or even our own inability to forgive those who have offended us.  Unforgiveness and bitterness, in fact, are two of the most enslaving emotions known to man.

Take the example of a woman in an abusive marriage who files for divorce.  There may be a real sense of relief when she no longer has to live with the abusive spouse but is she just as free in her soul from the damaging effects of that relationship?

When the children of Israel left Egypt, we know they were at times tempted to want to return. They complained, they griped and they moaned against Moses and against God.  The question comes to mind: Did ‘Pharaoh’ go with them?

Oh, surely they left Pharaoh behind in Egypt, but was he still having an effect over their lives?  The answer is, of course, yes!  He continued to have full control over their psyche.

On the seventh day of Passover, we celebrate the splitting of the Red Sea. The behavior of the children of Israel on that day reveals that though God had delivered them by means of amazing and powerful miracles, they still feared Egypt’s might and power.  They panicked as Pharaoh’s army approached in the distance. It was only after the sea split—and they saw the Egyptians dead on the seashore—that they finally experienced complete deliverance, not just physically but psychologically as well.

It’s easy to think of ourselves as free when we’ve overcome some difficult circumstance or limitation. We may be shocked, however, to discover that “Pharaoh” still pursues us even after we’ve escaped his Egypt. But the abuser closing in on us is the “Pharaoh” we’ve allowed to come with us in our thought life.  I’m reminded of the saying you’ve probably heard, ‘It took a day to get Israel out of Egypt but forty years in the desert to get Egypt out of Israel.

So how do we eradicate these demons from our inner world? How do we live free of the personal Egypt within ourselves?

By asking God to split open our inner sea of fears, anxieties, worries, cares and addictions.

To split the Red sea, G‑d “turned the sea into dry land.” Deep beneath the surface of our lives is the power and grace of God which keeps us alive day after day.  To transform the sea into dry land means to reveal that neither we, nor our world, are separate from God; that He alone has full control over our lives and knows what’s best for us; that He cares for us lovingly and leads us perfectly.

In Tune with Torah this week = Passover is a wonderful opportunity to ask God for total freedom from whatever troubles you.  If you are plagued with worry and fear, ask Him for a new and deep understanding of His love for you – the love that drives out fear.  If addiction of one sort or another is the problem, He IS the great deliverer.  He is more than willing to set you free.

Sometimes we don’t even realize we have a “pharaoh” in our life but most of us do. Passover is the perfect time to “send him back to Egypt” so that we can move on to our Promised Land unhindered.

A blessed Passover season to you and shabbat shalom

Weekly Torah Commentary – Va-eira January 12, 2018

Torah reading:  Exodus 6:2 – 9:35

Haftorah reading: Ezekiel 28:25 – 29:21

When Pharaoh shall speak to you, saying ‘Work a miracle, then, you shall say to Aaron, Take your staff and throw it down before Pharaoh, that it may become a serpent. So Moses and Aaron came to Pharaoh, and they did just as the Lord had commanded: and Aaron threw his staff down before Pharaoh, and his servants, and it became a serpent.” Then Pharaoh also called the wise men and the sorcerers: and the magicians of Egypt did the same with their enchantments for they threw down their staffs, and they became serpents; but Aaron’s staff swallowed up their staffs. Exodus 7: 8-12

MosesAaron

This is one of the most interesting passages in the Torah. It opens our eyes to several deep spiritual truths and exposes certain things to us that may not be very clear to the way we moderns think.

There are only two major sources of spiritual power: The power of God and the power of evil.  Yes, my friends, there is Evil and it exists because of demonic forces at work in the world. From days of old, Satan has sought to mimic whatever God does.  That agenda was born in him when as the prophet Isaiah tells us, Satan sought to make himself equal with God.  The result was that he was thrown out of the heavens, out of God’s presence. (see Isaiah 14:12 – 20)

In this scripture passage we see two servants of the Holy One of Israel, a pagan ruler and his ‘magicians’.  By tapping into evil power, the magicians mimicked what Aaron did.  But realize this: the magicians’ power was severely limited.  Their serpents were quickly swallowed up by Aaron’s!  Pharaoh had several magicians so there were several snakes, but Aaron’s serpent did away with them in a moment. When a weaker power comes against a stronger power, the weaker power must of necessity bow to greater strength.

More than once in the Scriptures we see serpent against serpent: When serpents were biting the Israelites in the wilderness and Moses cried to the Lord, the solution was another serpent. God uses the coin of the enemy to pay back the enemy.

 

Spiritual warfare is not entertainment: It is real war.  The contest of the serpents was a violent one, ending in utter destruction of the magicians’ serpents.  Elijah dealings with the 850 prophets of Baal was no less violent. These two events among others in the Scriptures teach us that political correctness does not work with enemies of the most High God!

To accurately assess world conditions and international events we must be aware that there are spiritual forces at work in the world.  A great war between good and evil was launched centuries ago and continues to this day.  In the midst of this war we are too often ignorant of what the real issues are.  Instead of recognizing the implications of the contest between Moses and Aaron versus the magicians of Pharaoh, we stand and watch as if it were entertainment instead of warfare.

Mankind was created for one purpose: to know God and to enjoy fellowship with Him eternally.  Each of us has been given a span of years during which we are to learn about Him, come to know Him personally and live our days according to His principles and commandments.  The ‘sons of light’ and the ‘sons of darkness’ perspective of the Essenes in the first century addresses this clearly.

Life is made up of varying experiences.  We prefer the joys and blessings that come our way and if we could, would avoid life’s hardships, challenges and sorrows. However, a necessary part of life is its battles for it is through them that we gain maturity, wisdom and a closer relationship with our God, provided we make godly decisions in the midst of the battlefields of daily living.

In Tune with Torah this week = Thankfully, we know from the Torah and the Prophets that the Holy One of Israel triumphs. Knowing that the God we serve has secured the final triumph, it behooves us to live in such a way that our faith in His eternal victory is evident and guides our decision-making on a day to day basis.

Shabbat Shalom

 

Weekly Torah Commentary – Vayakhel-Pekudei March 24, 2017

Torah Reading: Exodus 35-40
Haftorah Reading: Ezekiel 45:16 – 46:18

In this week’s Haftorah portion we find the commandment of Passover reiterated by the prophet Ezekiel to the people of Israel.

In the first month, on the fourteenth of the month, you shall have the Passover, a feast of seven days; unleavened bread shall be eaten. Ezekiel 45:21

Pesach2

This year Passover begins on April 11th and ends on April 18th. Most households here in Israel are already in the throes of preparation. One’s entire home is cleaned until it’s spotless; menus for the seven days are planned and except for perishables, the shopping has already started; and invitations to one’s Seder meal have already been dispatched. It’s an exceedingly busy time, especially in Israel.

But beyond all that, what is most important about Passover is what we remember and what we look forward to. Like all the Biblical festivals, Passover is past, present and future.  It speaks of our past deliverance, our present determination and our future destiny.

Passover conveys five major concepts that serve every generation well. They are the five most important things to know about Passover, and to incorporate into every day of the rest of the year. They are: history, optimism, faith, family, and responsibility.

1) History or Memory: It has been said that the idea of history originated with the Hebrews going all the way back to Abraham.

“Remember that you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”
“Remember that the Lord took you out of the bondage of slavery.”

To record and remember is a biblical mandate that had never seemed important to anyone else before the Jewish people came on the scene. It was the Passover story that initiated a commitment to memory. History is the only way we can learn from the past. History allows us to grow by standing on the shoulders of giants. Make a mistake once, and you’re human. Never learn from what happened before, and you’re brainless. That’s why it’s so important to heed the famous words of George Santayana that “Those who do not learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.”

2) Optimism: The most difficult task Moses had to perform was not to get the Jews out of Egypt, but to get Egypt out of the Jews. They had become so acclimated to their status as slaves, they lost all hope that they could ever be free. Hope creates optimism and the hope they held onto originated in the covenant of God with Abraham.

The true miracle of Passover is the message that with God’s help, no difficulty is insurmountable. A tyrant like Pharaoh could be overthrown. A nation as powerful as Egypt could be defeated. Slaves could be free. The oppressed could break the shackles of their captivity. Anything is possible, if only we dare to dream the impossible dream. That hope is, someone has said, in the DNA of the Jew. I hope it’s in yours as well!

3) Faith: The very foundation of Judaism and the Jewish people is FAITH. That is the legacy which our father Abraham bequeathed to us. Some four hundred and thirty years before the Torah was given, FAITH in a personal God was planted firmly into the Abrahamic line of descendants, into their spiritual heritage.

The God of Sinai didn’t say “I am the Lord your God who created the heavens and the earth.” Instead, he announced, “I am the Lord your God who took you out of the land of Egypt, the house of bondage.” The God of creation could theoretically have forsaken the world once he completed his task. The God of the Exodus is constantly involved in our history and has an unshakeable commitment to our survival.

4) Family: The importance of family cannot be overstated. God built his nation not by commanding not a collective gathering of hundreds of thousands in a public square but by asking Jews to turn their homes into places of family worship at a Seder devoted primarily to answering the questions of children. The home is where we first form our identities and discover our values. No wonder then that commentators point out the very first letter of the Torah is a bet, the letter whose meaning is house. All of the Torah follows only after we understand the primacy of family.

5) Responsibility: Passover reminds us that no man is an island. We are responsible first for ourselves, yes; but also for family, friends and society.
As we celebrate the great deliverance from slavery, some may ask why were we enslaved to begin with? Why did God allow that?

The Torah and the Prophets tell us that we were slaves in Egypt – and so we must have empathy for the downtrodden in every generation. We were slaves in Egypt – so we must be concerned with the rights of the strangers, the homeless and the impoverished. We experienced oppression – and so we must understand more than anyone else the pain of the oppressed.

The purpose of our suffering was to turn us into a people committed to righting the wrongs of the world, to become partners with God in preparing the world to become the Kingdom of God, the Kingdom to be ruled by the Messiah.

In Tune with Torah this week = From earliest childhood every Jew child learns to embrace these five ideals: history (memory), optimism, faith, family and responsibility. These are not just ideals for the Jewish people but for all nations and all peoples. As we prepare for Passover let us ponder these truths and renew our personal commitment to all that they represent.

Shabbat Shalom

Weekly Torah Commentary – April 22, 2016 PASSOVER

We have an unusual situation this Shabbat. Friday night at sundown, not only does the Sabbath begin, but also the week long Festival of Passover.  Therefore the regular Torah cycle of readings is suspended until after Passover is completed.

Pesach

The readings for this week are Exodus 12:21-51, Numbers 28:16-25 and Joshua 3:5-7, 5:2 – 6:1, 6:27.  I encourage you to read them at your leisure.

Here in Israel, our people have been super busy, cleaning all the leaven out of their homes and preparing for the Seder (festive meal) Friday evening.  What is it about Passover that is so special that an entire nation prepares diligently, even feverishly, for it each year?

Early in the Torah, God defines himself by the event commemorated each year at Passover: At the beginning of the ten commandments he introduces himself like this: “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery”. 

Previously He called Himself “The God of Abraham Isaac and Jacob”, or “I AM” but beginning at this point He is “The One who brought you out of Egypt” and that self-description is repeated throughout the Hebrew Bible literally hundreds of times.

Many of the Psalms refer to the Passover miracle and though many Jewish people consider Mt. Sinai as the defining moment, perhaps God sees the Passover as the cornerstone of the Israel story.  Passover was the moment in history when the Jewish race became the Jewish faith.

Our God is all about freedom; human choice is at the heart of the unfolding deliverance of the children of Israel from Egyptian slavery. Even though God “hardened Pharaoh’s heart”, that only happened after some serious choices on Pharaoh’s part to harden his own heart first. God just confirmed his free choice.

The children of Israel also had to choose whether to go along with God’s plan or not. They were not rescued from the Angel of Death by force – He gave them an “opt in” clause: to have death pass over your house, you must sacrifice a lamb and dab its blood on your door frame. This act of faith constituted the individual’s response to a command of God which carried a promise with it.  All who believed it was true and acted accordingly were saved. That means that those who escaped from Egypt freely chose to obey God and follow him by faith – not just because of their national ancestry. This is the moment that the people of Israel became a faith community.

As we mentioned, the ten commandments are introduced by God’s reminder that he loves to set slaves free, and the very first command when he subsequently lays down the rest of the Torah is this: “These are the laws you are to set before them: If you buy a Hebrew servant, he is to serve you for six years. But in the seventh year, he shall go free, without paying anything.” (Exodus 21:1-2). What a strange subject with which to start a new code of government, spiritual life and ethics! But God is determined that his people should not be in slavery – they should be free. This is the message of passover. That is what the exodus was all about. God is serious about making his people free.

Remembering is very important to God. The Bible frequently urges us to do just that: “Remember”.  If we remember what God has done, what He has said and who He is, we our faith in Him is energized and our trust solidifies.

The Passover Seder meal is a festive, teaching, and remembering experience, instituted by God himself, in order to prevent us from forgetting His amazing power and faithfulness. Today the family celebration is based around four cups of wine and a “haggadah” or “telling” which is like an order of service. There are different ideas about what each of the four cups represents, but generally the first cup is about being set apart for God, the second is the time to tell the story, the third is after the meal, when Jewish people usually give thanks for their food, and the last one is “hallel” or praise, during which the psalms of thanksgiving are recited.

Each item of food on the table symbolizes something in the story  and each aspect of the evening helps the Jewish people to remember the miracles God did for them and even to re-live them. It is as if we ourselves were delivered from the oppression of Pharoah.

The ultimate purpose of the Seder is to re-awaken and strengthen relationship. God wants intimacy with his people. God looks back at that time right after the exodus as something of a honeymoon with his people:

“This is what the LORD says:“‘I remember the devotion of your youth, how as a bride you loved me and followed me through the wilderness, through a land not sown. Israel was holy to the LORD, the firstfruits of his harvest”. Jeremiah 2:1-3

“Therefore I am now going to allure her; I will lead her into the wilderness and speak tenderly to her. There I will give her back her vineyards, and will make the Valley of Achor a door of hope. There she will respond as in the days of her youth, as in the day she came up out of Egypt.” Hosea 2:14-15

Someone once said “a dessert is something you want and don’t need, but the desert is something you don’t want, but you do need”.  We all experience ‘desert’ times in our spiritual life but it’s often during those times that our relationship with God deepends. One day ultimate rest will be ours but until then, life with God is not always going to be a walk in the park.

Passover is the time to draw closer to the One who delivers, saves and redeems.  We are with him, and he is with us. We are his people, and he is our God. The joy of relationship with Him is our strength and our song.

It is also a time to look to the future. “The days are coming,” declares the LORD, “when it will no longer be said, ‘As surely as the LORD lives, who brought the Israelites up out of Egypt,’ but it will be said, ‘As surely as the LORD lives, who brought the Israelites up out of the land of the north and out of all the countries where he had banished them.’ For I will restore them to the land I gave their ancestors.” Jeremiah 16:14-16 .

The story of God and the children of Israel is not over yet. God has indeed brought the Israelites out from the land of the north (Russia and surrounding area) and thousands have come to live in Israel from countries around the globe.  Many do not yet attribute this phenomenon to God but the days are coming when they will know it is truly His doing.

Meanwhile, we celebrate the Passover past and look forward to the future ‘Passover’ when we will transition from life as we know it to the promised manifestation of the restored Kingdom of God on this earth.  May it come quickly, even in our day!

A blessed Passover to all my readers – and Shabbat Shalom!

 

 

Weekly Torah Commentary — Beshalach January 22, 2016

Exodus 13:17-17:16

In last week’s reading, we reviewed the first seven plagues and their effect on Egypt.  The saga continues into this week’s reading with the last three plagues, culminating in the death of the firstborn of every Egyptian household, from the palace of Pharaoh to the hut of the lowliest Egyptian.  Even the firstborn of the Egyptians’ animals died. But in Goshen, where the Hebrews lived, not one firstborn died because of the obedience of the people to swab the blood of the Passover lamb on their doorposts, as instructed by God through Moses.  This story is re-told in full every Passover.

Studying the passage this year, I was suddenly struck by a thought that had never entered my mind in all the years I’ve been studying the scriptures.  Could it be that in fact there were, in a manner of speaking, eleven plagues? Not just ten, as we commonly think?  Let me explain.

The process of getting Pharaoh to finally agree to release his army of slave laborers, the children of Israel, was a lengthy and painful one for the Egyptian people.  The water turned to blood, their homes were infested with frogs, the very dust turned into swarms and swarms of lice and on and on it continued until the final devastating plague: the death of every firstborn in Egypt.  Finally Pharaoh relented and in fact, commanded Moses to take the people and go.

However, though the children of Israel walked out of Egypt into the desert, Pharaoh still had the option of harassing them.  We see it happen when shortly after their departure, Pharaoh says to his advisers, ‘What have we done, letting all those Israelite slaves get away?’  They decide to take action.

‘So Pharaoh harnessed his chariot and called up his troops.  He took with him 600 of Egypt’s best chariots, along with the rest of the chariots of Egypt, each with its commander.  The Lord hardened the heart of Pharaoh, the king of Egypt, so he chased after the people of Israel…’  Exodus 14:6-8

Was their freedom to be so short-lived?  Would a brief taste of freedom disintegrate into ever deeper slavery? Were they to be dragged back to Egypt in chains and subjected to harsh punishment?

By this time, seven days after they left Egypt, the Hebrews were camped by the shores of the sea. Terrified as they saw Pharaoh’s vast army approaching from the distance, the people cried and Moses prayed. At God’s instruction, Moses extended his staff over the waters and God made a way through the sea for His people.

Pharaoh and his army plunged after them, galloping into the sea as the last of the Israelites climbed up on the opposite shore. Moses lifted his staff again and the text relates that all of Egypt’s army was destroyed, its chariots, its armor and its soldiers. Is it any wonder that the people burst forth into a song of praise as they witnessed the victory of God on their behalf?  This, I propose, could be considered the 11th plague.

The mighty Hand of God had purchased their redemption in Egypt, but at the Red Sea that redemption was secured.  Not only were they free men, but the very oppressor who had enslaved them was now stripped of his ability to inflict any further harm upon them or to drag them back into slavery again.  No wonder Miriam led the women in a song of celebration as they danced for joy.

Devoted to God and His Torah, we seek to live our life within the parameters of His will. Yet in this life we encounter “harassment” in the form of trials, disappointments, setbacks and outright temptations.  We may be out of Egypt but we stand by the sea of this world pursued by an old ‘master’ every bit as real as Pharaoh of old.

Yet we have this precious hope: at the coming of the Messiah, the redeemed of the Lord will no longer have to struggle with the harassment of a former ‘master’.

In Tune with Torah this week = earlier generations had a keen sense of anticipation regarding the appearance of the promised Messiah.  Maimonides said, ‘Though the Messiah tarry, I will await him every day.’ Have we in this generation become so entangled in the pursuits of this life that our desire for His appearing is dulled?  Do we really want him to come?  Does the reality of eternal life in the presence of God impact the way we live? Are we eager to see the final ‘securing’ of our Redemption?

Shabbat Shalom

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Weekly Torah Commentary – Miketz December 11, 2015

Genesis 41:1 – 44:17

In this Torah portion, Joseph interprets the dreams of the Pharaoh, predicting seven years of plenty and seven years of famine, and as result becomes Viceroy or Prime Minister, the second most powerful man in Egypt. After the famine began, his brothers come to Egypt to buy food. Joseph recognizes them, but they do not recognize him. He keeps his identity hidden while he decides to test them. It will be yet some time before he reveals himself and asks for his father.

Biblical scholars have long wondered why Joseph never contacted his father. He’s called a tzaddik, a righteous man so how to explain this? Wouldn’t he have realized that his father was grieving?

Nachmanides (the Ramban) suggested in his commentary that Joseph could not have contacted his father until the dreams of his youth came true.  Only then could he be vindicated and reveal himself to his family.

Other commentators disagree with this view. Dreams are in the domain of God, they say; let Him worry about dreams. It is man’s job to do what is ethical, and the ethical thing for Joseph would have been to inform his father Jacob that he was alive and well.

A contemporary writer takes yet another position. Rabbi Yoel Bin Nun has suggested that perhaps the question is not Why did Joseph not contact Jacob? but instead, Why did Jacob not try to contact Joseph?

The answer seems straightforward; Jacob thought that Joseph was dead. However, Joseph had no idea what had happened back at home, and he could well have been asking himself: “Why doesn’t my father contact me?” We can agree that the sequence of events, from Joseph’s perspective, may suggest that line of thought.

Consider: Joseph knew that Jacob was well aware of the hostility between Joseph and his brothers. Could Joseph have wondered why Jacob sent him to look for his brothers in the first place?

Furthermore, there was a pattern in the family’s history that whenever relatives did not get along, the solution was to separate. It happened between Abraham and Lot, between Ishmael and Isaac and even with his father Jacob and his uncle, Esau. Could Joseph have assumed that because of all the dissension he stirred up in his father’s house, Jacob had decided to send him away?

Could it be that only upon learning from Judah that Jacob thinks his favorite son had been “ripped apart by beasts” [Genesis 44:28] did Joseph realize that his father thought that he was in fact dead?  Is that realization what prompted Joseph to reveal himself to his brothers at that moment and send for his father?

Another viewpoint: Given Joseph’s intimate relationship with his father Jacob, is it possible that Joseph thought, How can I expose to my father the terrible thing my brothers did? And if I betray them to my father, am I not doing as they did to me? What good will come of it? Shall my father lose his other ten sons because I make myself known to him?

According to this approach, Joseph’s consideration was completely selfless. To have been reunited with his father would clearly have been a great personal triumph for him, but it would have had tragic consequences. Therefore, Joseph chose to remain apart.

In Tune with Torah this week = try to imagine yourself in Joseph’s position. What would you have done? And why?

Shabbat Shalom

Weekly Torah Commentary — Passover April 3-4, 2015

Exodus 12: 21-51

As Passover this year falls on Shabbat, the regular Torah reading cycle is interrupted to accommodate the passages from the book of Exodus describing the deliverance of the Hebrew slaves under the leadership of Moses.  After repeated pleas by Moses to Pharaoh, ‘Let My people go!’ the ruler of Egypt finally relented after the final plague, the deaths of the firstborn of every household in Egypt. A nation of slaves became free men – literally overnight. Their hard labor was over.  Never again would they suffer the whippings of the taskmasters, the taunts of their supervisors.

Freedom from hard labor and physical bondage can be won in a day but attaining inner freedom is a lifetime journey all of us make.  Shackles can be removed from wrists and ankles but what of the mental and emotional shackles?

The story of the Exodus from Egypt and the journey to the Promised Land is that of life itself.  With freedom comes responsibility.  The children of Israel soon learned that their exit from Egypt gifted them with choices previously unavailable. But that very freedom carried consequences, as every decision does.

They learned that freedom doesn’t mean you can do anything you want; it means you are free to choose what is right and honorable. Excuses and rationalizations for doing otherwise have been eliminated.

They learned that freedom doesn’t provide the opportunity to indulge every self-serving whim but the privileged position to serve others in kindness and humility.

The freedom given to the Hebrew slaves was not an end in itself; it was the pathway to become what they were called to become: a holy nation, a chosen people, a treasure to the Most High.  Growing into that destiny meant daily repeated choices to obey God’s voice and follow His instructions.  As slaves they were required to obey the injunctions of brutal foremen who never hesitated to beat them into subjection if necessary.  As free men, they were called to obey the life-giving principles of a loving God, who was also their Father and their King. The truth is that obedience to God and His Word is the highest form of freedom man can enjoy.

To this day, men still struggle with the idea of freedom.  The lazy man prefers bondage for it demands no personal responsibility.  Yet God did not fashion us for captivity, but for freedom.

Passover is a good time for a spiritual ‘check up from the neck up’ because the main obstacle to our spiritual freedom is our mind; the world of our thoughts.  It’s no wonder that Solomon wrote, “As a man thinks in his heart, so is he.”

How free are you inside? In your inner being?

Are you free of the fear of what other people think?  (Or what you think they think?)

Are you free of negativity, complaining and griping?

Are you free of gossip and slander?

Are you free of greed, jealousy and envy?

The Holy One of Israel set us free, not that we should enslave ourselves all over again, but that we should live productive, loving and meaningful lives.

In Tune with Torah this week = during this major biblical holiday, take some time to have that ‘check up from the neck up’ and purpose to embrace the godly freedom that will propel you forward in your journey towards holiness.

May each of you be blessed in abundance this Passover week.  Let all of the ‘leaven of this world’ be eliminated and embrace with passion the purpose and destiny of your soul.

Shabbat Shalom and a wonderful Passover week to you all!