Weekly Torah Commentary – Nitzavim September 30, 2016

Deuteronomy 29:9-30:20

“See I have placed before you life and good, and death and evil … I have placed life and death before you, blessing and curse; and you shall choose life so that you and your offspring will live.”


God has given each of us a clear choice: the ability to choose life and good, or death and evil, and it is this choice that is the very foundation of our spiritual life.   Life and good vs. death and evil. Interesting parallels, don’t you think?

It would appear that the Torah is saying we have two pairs of choices, not just one. We have the right to choose good or evil; we also have the right to choose life or death.

To choose between good and evil is a straightforward commandment. While we face situations and temptations in life that would seek to seduce us away from faithfulness to God because the ‘evil’ seems to hold a greater promise of happiness than the ‘good, we know the right thing is to choose ‘good’. Whether we do or not is our responsibility.

But what about a choice between ‘life’ and ‘death’?  Apart from suicide, none of us chooses death over life.  In fact we have an innate drive for preservation of life.  So what are we to derive from this verse?

The ‘death’ referenced here is not simply a matter of ceasing to breathe.   And, the ‘life’ referenced here is not simply a matter of continuing to breathe!  The Torah is giving us spiritual principles.

Biblically speaking, the true meaning of life is that our time on this earth is a journey towards holiness.  Learning from His Word what He desires of us, developing our character, growing in spirituality is all part of what the Bible means by ‘choose life’. Being alive means directly facing the challenges that life presents and using them to become a better person.

Choosing ‘death’, on the other hand, is that attitude that avoids dealing with challenges, opts to escape difficulties and trials, and leaves spirituality off its radar. Death is the choice of comfort over effort, of a laze life over a life full of challenge and growth.

It is important to note that choosing death is not limited to failure to keep the commandments. Someone can appear to be doing all the right things externally and sitll be ‘dead’ inside. What is frightening is that such a person lives his life on ‘cruise control’ all the while believing he’s just fine. If he never really pushes himself to further develop his personal relationship with God, to make time for prayer, to work at improving his character, it could be said that he’s choosing a living death; the comfortable or lazy option.

Actually what we are discussing could be explained this way as well. Life is a constant struggle between two contradictory forces that pull us in opposite directions. The body wants its pleasurable comforts; the spirit of man hungers for a relationship with God, expressed by a desire to expand and grow. Thus, each person is constantly faced with these conflicting forces pulling him in opposite directions. In this week’s Torah Portion we are told that to succeed in life, must choose life.

This lesson is particularly appropriate as we approach Rosh Hashanah. On these Holy days we are urged to examine ourselves, to take a spiritual inventory of where we are as a person – what is important to us, what are our priorities?

The choice between living an essentially comfortable life (even if it is done in a ‘religious’ way) and striving to fulfill one’s potential in service to our God is an essential element of Rosh Hashanah.

In Tune with Torah this week = this weekend is the perfect time on God’s calendar to set aside some time to evaluate our spiritual life.  Are we consistent in seeking a closer relationship with the LORD, week by week, month by month? What do we struggle with and what steps will we take to overcome those struggles? In what ways is God calling us to deepen our relationship with Him?

Weekly Torah Commentary – Ki Tavo September 23, 2016

Deuteronomy 26:1-29:8

The famous list of blessings and curses is found in this week’s Torah portion.  As we look at these, it’s important to remember that God’s covenant with Abraham was unconditional while the Mosaic covenant is conditional.  The recurring phrase ‘If you will…I will…’ appears no less than forty times in the Torah!


If you fully obey the LORD your God and carefully keep all His commands that I am giving you today, the LORD your God will set you high above all the nations of the world.  You will experience ALL these blessings if you obey the LORD your God.  28:1-2

So what are all these blessings?  They are specifically listed in verses 3 – 12 of chapter 28 and I encourage you to read them for yourself, slowly and thoughtfully.  Verse 6 summarizes them blessings this way: Wherever you go and whatever you do, you will be blessed.

Wow! What a great promise? Aah…but remember the conditions!  If you obey the LORD your God and walk in His ways…..

The only way you and I can obey God is by knowing and understanding what it is that He requires of us.  We learn that by consistently studying His revealed Word.  Purposely establishing a set time in our daily routine to spend some time reading and pondering what the Bible has to say is not a luxury; it is mandatory to those who are serious about walking in the blessings of God.

‘But I’m so busy,’ you may protest.  I understand.  So am I.  However, let’s be honest.  We human beings are masters at finding time to do the things we really want to do.  If we ‘don’t have time’ for the Bible, what we are saying is that it’s not that important to me.  I guarantee if you take a hard look at how you spend your time from day to day, you will find a way to carve out 15-30 minutes for Bible reading and meditation.

How about limiting yourself to 30 minutes less on Facebook?  I recently read an article claiming that the average adult spends up to four hours on social media per day!!!

Or getting up 30 minutes earlier to begin each day with God’s Word?

Or turning off the TV 30 minutes earlier in the evening and taking that time for Bible reading?   Stay-at-home Moms with young children, how about pulling out your Bible when the little ones are napping?

There are so many ways that we can make it work – we just need the ‘want to’ !

Look at the list of blessings again:

*…your towns and your fields will be blessed…

*…your children and your crops…

*…the offspring of your animals

*…your food supply  (fruit baskets and bread boards)

*…rain will fall at the appropriate times to water your crops

*…the Lord Himself will conquer your enemies for you

and more…

By contrast, the curses for disobedience are lengthy – 47 verses!  It’s a worthwhile exercise to read through those verse as well, keeping in mind that it is not God’s desire to ‘curse’ anyone.  We curse ourselves when we refuse to obey His instructions.

Look at verse 15: But if you refuse to listen to the LORD your God and do not obey all the commands and decrees I am giving you today, all these curses will come and overwhelm you.

We need to understand that these ‘curses’ are societal, national.  What each one does, how each one lives does in fact have an effect on the whole of society. We are ‘our brother’s keeper’ to a degree and no man lives only to himself.  We cannot hide ourselves away in our homes, caring nothing for what is happening in our city or in our nation.

This week’s Torah portion calls us to strengthen our community consciousness.

In Tune with Torah this week = by all means, make the time to read chapter 28 of Deuteronomy – all of it.  What contribution are you making to the well being of your family, your immediate community, your city and your nation?  What changes are called for?

Shabbat Shalom


Weekly Torah Commentary – Ki Tetzei September 16, 2016

Deuteronomy 21:10-25:19

Do not hate an Edomite, because he is your brother.
Do not hate an Egyptian, because you were a stranger in his land. (Deut. 23:8)


Two verses in this week’s portion deal with the prohibition to hate.  The portion deals with so many other issues that it’s easy to miss this commandment – do not hate.

But why these particular two verses?

The Egyptians of Moses’ day had enslaved the Israelites, “embittered their lives”, subjected them to a ruthless regime of intensely hard labor and forced them to eat the bread of affliction. They had embarked on a program of attempted genocide, Pharaoh commanding his people to throw “every male [Israelite] child born, into the river” (Ex. 1:22). And God tells the next generation of Israelites: ‘do not hate’?

It’s as if none of this had happened, as if the Israelites owed the Egyptians a debt of gratitude for their hospitality. Yet Moses and the people were where they were only because they were escaping from Egyptian persecution. Nor did he want the people to forget it.  It is commanded in the Torah that every year on Passover we are to remember what the Egyptians did.  But why? So we would never succumb to enslaving others.

What is really at stake here with these two verses cuts to the very heart of what is about to happen to the children of Israel.  It is nearly time to enter the Land and Moses knows that in order to live in freedom, you must let go of hatred. A free and moral society cannot be built by people consumed with hatred and resentment.  It just doesn’t work.

Bitterness, resentment, humiliation, a sense of injustice, the desire to inflict injury on your former persecutors are all evidences of a profound lack of freedom. Those who hold on to anger against their persecutors remain captives.  They may be ‘free’ externally but the soul is in captivity and poisons the mind and the emotions.  Anyone who allows their ‘enemy’ or ‘persecutor’ to define who they are has no understanding of freedom.

What Moses is telling them is that they must live with the past, but not in the past.

Hatred and freedom cannot coexist.  To create and maintain a non-persecuting society out of people who have been persecuted, the chains of the past must be broken; memory robbed of its sting; and pain re-directed into constructive purpose and the determination to build a different future.

Hatred projects our conflicts onto someone else whom we can blame but only at the cost of denying our own responsibility. That was Moses’ message to those who were about to enter the promised land: that a free society can be built only by people who accept the responsibility of freedom; by a people who are not defined by what they hate but by what they dream and work for.  This was the insightful message of Dr. Martin Luther King, among others.  Dr. King once said: Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that. Hate multiplies hate, violence multiplies violence, and toughness multiplies toughness.  How right he was…and still is.

People who hate harbor a permanent feeling of injury, a feeling that is out of all proportion to reality.  In their subconscious a perverse feeling convinces them that they alone possess the truth, that they are some kind of superhumans, and thus deserve the world’s complete recognition and submissiveness. They want to be the center of the world and become deeply, even violently irritated when those around them do not recognize them as such.

They are like spoiled or badly brought up children who think their mother exists only to wait on their every whim and who throw a tantrum if she occasionally does something else, like spending time with her other children, her husband, a book or her work. They interpret it as a personal attack instead of normal living.

Ultimately the hater is obsessed with himself.

Some have suggested that those who hate suffer from an inferiority complex.  Actually the opposite is true: the hater is so sure of his own superiority that hate is the only response to those who do not affirm or appreciate his self-generated true worth.  A serious face, a quickness to take offense, strong language, shouting, the inability to step outside himself and see his own foolishness – these are typical of one who hates.

Our Torah portion this week enjoins us: Do not hate... Rather choose the way of the prophet who said ‘The joy of the LORD is your strength.’  Nehemiah 8:10

In Tune with Torah this week = is there any hate in your heart towards anyone?  If so, this is the time to acknowledge it, repent of it, ask God for freedom from it and determine to change your attitude for the truth is this: Hatred kills the one who harbors it; only love and peace bring health and well-being, physically as well as spiritually.

Shabbat shalom

Weekly Torah Commentary – Re-eh September 2, 2016


This week’s jam-packed portion opens with these words: “I set before you a blessing and a curse. The blessing: if you obey the commandments of God…; the curse if you do not … and you follow other gods.”

It continues with rules and laws for the land of Israel primarily oriented towards staying away from idol worship and from embracing the other religions in the land.

The source of the Chosen People concept is found in 14:1-2: “You are a nation consecrated to God your Lord. God has chosen you from all nations on the face of the earth to be His own special nation.”  We have been chosen for responsibility, not privilege — to act morally and to be a “light unto the nations”. As descendants of Abraham through Isaac, we are first and foremost to be a people of Faith in the One True God, the Holy One of Israel.

The Torah states, “For if you shall diligently keep all these commandments which I command you to do them, to love the Lord, your God, to walk in all His ways and to cleave to Him…” (Deuteronomy 11:22). How does one “cleave to the Almighty?”

The Torah tells us that even someone who appears to be highly observant of the commandments and loves God, must show in his behavior and interactions with others that he is an imitator of God (“to walk in all His ways”). Only then can a person be considered as one who cleaves to Him. Emulating God means being compassionate and bestowing kindness on others. As He is merciful so we should be merciful, as He bestows kindness, so we should bestow kindness. One might think that a person who loves God need only devote himself to prayer and Torah study and by this means he will cleave to God. We see from this verse, however, that an essential ingredient in cleaving to God is caring about our fellow man.

It is by truly caring about others (you shall love your neighbor as yourself) that we show ourselves to be godly.

It is noteworthy that this portion of the Torah is read just before the onset of the Hebrew month of Elul which will begin at sundown tomorrow. Elul, when spelled in Hebrew letters, is the acronym for the words, “I am to my beloved, my beloved is to me” (ani l’dodi v’dodi li) Oftentimes those words will be inscribed on the inside of an engagement ring).


The month of Elul is a time of heightened spirituality when the Almighty is, as it were, extends grace for repentance in a unique way. It is a time of introspection and preparation for Rosh Hashanah. It is a time to do a spiritual audit and to commit to making whatever changes necessary to deepen your connection with Him. 

In Tune with Torah this week = as we approach the month of Elul, let us take very seriously the admonition to use this coming month as an opportunity to do a true “check up from the neck up” – to examine ourselves and our thought life as it is our thoughts that give birth to our words and our behaviors. How are we doing at loving others as we love ourselves, for example? This is the month to search our own souls and determine to grow in godliness in the new Hebrew year, 5777, which will begin on October 3, 2016.

Shabbat shalom

Weekly Torah Commentary – Matot-Maasei August 5, 2016

Numbers 30 – 36

In this week’s portion, two of the tribes, Reuben and Gad, agree together that the land east of the Jordan is ideally suited as pasture for their large herds and flocks of livestock. They approach Moses and ask permission to settle there rather than cross the Jordan. Initially, Moses is furious at their request.  “Shall your fellow countrymen go to war while you sit here?” he asks. Had they learned nothing from the sin of the spies who, by demoralizing others through their behavior, condemned an entire generation to forty years of wandering in the desert?


The Reubenites and Gadites get the point. They protest that they are not trying to exempt themselves from the struggles of their fellow Israelites. They are fully prepared to accompany them into the promised land and fight alongside them to conquer the Land. “We will not return to our homes until every Israelite has received his inheritance.”  After declaring publicly their commitment to participate in taking the Land, Moses grants their request on condition that they fulfill their word. “When the land is then conquered before God you may then return, innocent before God and Israel, and this land will be yours as your permanent property before God.”

The phrase – ‘you will be innocent before God and Israel’ – teaches an important lesson. It is not enough to do what is right in the eyes of God. One must also behave in such a way as to be seen to have done right in the eyes of one’s fellow man. It is incumbent upon us to live in such a way that we are above suspicion, men and women of uncontested integrity.

That sounds great but the reality of life is that at times even when we do conduct ourselves in a manner that we think is above suspicion and full of integrity, we still may find ourselves the object of criticism and judgments from others.  When that happens, how do we handle it?

First of all, those who pass judgment on others say more about themselves than they do about the person they are criticizing.  Remember that!  What we should be doing is finding the best in every person, not emphasizing what we perceive as their weaknesses or failures. (If, however, the criticism is constructive, our response should be one of humility and teachableness.)

Secondly, keep in mind that keeping a clear conscience before God is a much higher priority than being approved of by men.  It takes courage to do right, even if one has to stand alone, but that is the kind of integrity and courage that great men and women throughout the ages have exhibited and we do well to follow in their footsteps.

Reuben and Gad accepted Moses’ criticism and correction.  To their credit they kept their promise and went in to the Land to fight against the enemies of Israel.  But in the end, they returned to the other side of the Jordan.  They stopped short of taking possession of the Land God had promised Israel.  At the very border, instead of looking straight ahead, they looked to the right and to the left and decided to stay.

This is a second deeply significant lesson out of this week’s Torah portion.  When God instructs us, it is not enough to go part of the way, or even 98% of the way.  If we are committed to live by His Word, there is no room for compromise. Go all the way!

After the death of Moses, God spoke to Joshua and said, “Only be strong and very courageous; be careful to do according to all the Torah which Moses My servant commanded you; do not turn from it to the right or to the left, so that you may have success wherever you go. Joshua 1:7

We are constantly bombarded with more than enough distractions in this world that easily draw our attention ‘to the right and to the left’ of what God has told us in His word.  This week’s Torah portion, as we come to the end of the book of Numbers, closes with these two very significant admonitions.

  1. Let integrity guide your thoughts, words and actions regardless of whether or not anyone understands. Your focus is to please God, not men.
  2. Refuse to be a 98% kind of person.  Go for the gold!  Be radical enough to obey God fully.

In Tune with Torah this week = taking these two principles to heart and checking our own lifestyle.  How are we doing?

Shabbat shalom



Weekly Torah Commentary – Balak July 22, 2016

Numbers 22:2 – 25:9

In this week’s portion, the Torah introduces a non-Hebrew prophet, Bilam or Balaam, as most English bibles spell his name.  The children of Israel have prevailed over the Amorites and the people of Moab hear about it.  They are therefore fearful so when the Israelites set up camp opposite Moab,  Balak, the king of Moab, sends messengers to the prophet, Bilam.  He has one request of the prophet: come and curse this nation that is camped opposite us.  When they arrive at Bilam’s home, they present their request and the prophet invites them to spend the night so he can hear from God regarding the king’s request.

God’s response is unequivocal.  God said to Bilam, ‘Do not go with them; you shall not curse the people, for they are blessed.’ Num. 22:12  In the morning, Bilam sends the messengers back to the king with the message that God will not allow Bilam to curse Israel.

So far, so good.  Unfortunately the story doesn’t end here.

Balak sends another contingent of messengers, more distinguished than the last, promising honor to Bilam if he will agree to curse the Israelite nation.  One would think that Bilam would stand on his previous answer and send them back to the king.  He does make a ‘religious’ reply: ‘Though Balak were to give me his house full of silver and gold, I could not do anything either small or great, contrary to the command of the Lord, my God.’ Num. 22:18 Nevertheless, he invites this group also to spend the night so he can see ‘what else the Lord may speak to me.’  A dangerous move – God had already spoken to him but Bilam is hoping for a different answer the second time around.

Have you ever known someone who goes for counseling but instead of following the advice first given, they go to a second person or even a third, until they hear what they want to hear? In Bilam’s behavior we see a clear example of a very human trait: We see what we want to see and we hear what we want to hear.

God came to Bilam that night and said to him, ‘If the men have come to call you, rise up and go with them; but only the word which I speak shall you say.’  Num. 22:20  God essentially says ‘Go ahead. Do what you want to do, but you may not say anything I haven’t said!’  Bilam heard what he wanted to hear, saddled his donkey and went on his way. How many times have we acted like Bilam? Knowing what God wants us to do yet choosing to do what we want to do.

God was not pleased and sent an angel to impede Bilam’s journey. The donkey saw the angel and three times stopped moving ahead.  Bilam, not seeing the angel, beat the donkey in anger and frustration at which point, God opened the donkey’s mouth:


‘What have I done to you that you have struck me these three times?’  Bilam replied, ‘Because you have embarrassed me. If there was a sword in my hand, I would have killed you by now.’ The donkey replied, ‘Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden all of your life to this day? Have I ever done this to you before?’  Bilam replied, ‘No.’  (vs. 28-30)

Then the Lord opened Bilam’s eyes and he saw the angel of the Lord standing in the way.

It seems to me that when Bilam’s donkey started talking, the prophet should have seen immediately that it was time to repent!  To be fair, he did say, ‘I have sinned,’ but look at the rest of the sentence: ‘I did not know that you were standing in the way against me.  Now then, if it is displeasing to you, I’ll turn back.’

Take a good look at those words. He’s still hedging. It’s what he didn’t say that counts.

He didn’t say, ‘Lord, my God I have sinned.  Please forgive me.  I will turn back immediately.’

It’s one thing to admit, ‘I have sinned’ but that’s not necessarily repentance.  Just to acknowledge one’s failure without asking forgiveness and taking steps to correct one’s failure is only third of the process.  In addition, he offers something of a rationalization, ‘I didn’t know you were standing there’ he says to the angel, ‘and now if you’re really displeased, then I’ll turn back.’  IF you’re REALLY displeased??? Seriously!

Bilam is STILL not submitting in his heart to what God told him the first time he asked for direction.  Do you see that?

Not a one of us can throw stones at the prophet for we have done the same thing. Every failure – no matter what form it takes – is choosing what we want over what God wants.  We see what we want to see and we hear what we want to hear.  God’s desire is that we see as He sees, hear what He says and embrace His will in ready obedience.

Bilam did go to Balak but he was utterly unable to curse the Hebrew nation.  Instead he blessed them, not just once but three times.  In the course of his blessing, he uttered words that have resounded through the generations:

God is not a man that He should lie, nor a son of man that He should repent.  Has He said and will He not do it? Or has He spoken and will He not make it good?  Numbers 23:19

With these words, Bilam – a gentile prophet – declared to the world the integrity of the Lord God, His faithfulness to keep His word and to fulfill every promise He has made.

Our faith is built on nothing less than God’s incomparable faithfulness.  We believe Him because He is Who He says He is and His Word will never return to him void, without accomplishing that for which it was spoken. For the revelation of these words, we thank Bilam and we learn as well that God uses even the imperfect to deliver His message.

In Tune with Torah this week = Let us each ask our Father in heaven to grant us grace to see with His eyes and hear with the ears of disciples that we may live a life of loving obedience to whatever He directs us to do.  Key Word: ‘whatever’

Shabbat Shalom

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Weekly Torah Commentary — Chukat July 15, 2016

Numbers 19:1 – 22:1

The first thing we need to understand is that between vs. 22 of Numbers 19 and vs. 1 of Numbers 20, thirty-eight years have passed!  The congregation of the sons of Israel who arrived at the wilderness of Zin ‘in the first month’ are, by and large, the children of the generation that came out of Egypt.  You may remember that God had decreed that generation would die in the wilderness because of the sin of the Golden Calf and their children would go into the Land.

This new generation set up camp in Kadesh and Miriam died there and was buried.  Immediately afterward we read:

“There was no water for the congregation and they assembled themselves against Moses and Aaron. The people thus contended with Moses and spoke, saying, ‘If only we had perished when our brothers perished before the Lord! Why have you brought the Lord’s assembly into this wilderness for us to die here?  Why have you made us come up from Egypt to bring us into this wretched place? It is not a place of grain or figs or vines or pomegranates; nor is there any water to drink.’

This generation grew up knowing  that they were destined to enter the Land.  They watched over the years as one after another of the elder generation passed away.  By this time there were few of the elderly left and Moses was now almost 120 years old.  It is a very different situation from the time when this generation’s parents had complained about a lack of water.

In Exodus 17: 1-7 a similar complaint was brought to Moses: ‘Give us water to drink’.  Moses turned to the Lord Who instructed him to strike the rock and water would flow out.  He did – and it did.

All these years later, the children present the same complaint but with a slightly different inference. What they are really saying is ‘Moses, why did you bring us out here? Why have we settled here in Kadesh? We’re supposed to be going into the Land.  Look, the older generation is just about gone. Get us out of this desert now.  We don’t want to wait anymore!’

Moses and Aaron fell on their faces at the entrance to the Tabernacle.  The Lord spoke to Moses, commanding him to take his rod – the staff he had used at so many critical junctures of the journey – and in the presence of the people, to speak to the rock and water would flow.


So Moses and Aaron gathered the people.  With the staff in his hand, Moses addressed the people: ‘Listen now, you rebels! shall we bring forth water for you out of this rock?’  Then he struck the rock twice and water flowed.

But God was not happy with Moses. He said, ‘Because you have not believed Me, to sanctify Me as holy in the sight of the sons of Israel, therefore you shall not bring this assembly into the Land which I have given them.’  Key word: ‘believed’

Many have suggested that Moses’ punishment was due to his outburst of anger and/or because he disobeyed by striking the rock instead of speaking to it.  is there anything else here we need to discover?

Notice that God did not rebuke Moses for not ‘obeying’ Him but for not ‘believing’ Him. It was Moses’ faith – or lack thereof – that God faulted him for.

Moses had always used the rod in the working of miracles. But here, God was changing the strategy. God said , ‘Speak’ -use your voice, Moses.  It was a test, one that Moses had faced before.

We remember a much earlier time when God was also annoyed with Moses.  In Exodus 4: 10-14, Moses protests God’s call on his life saying ‘Please, Lord, I’ve never been eloquent, neither recently nor in time past, nor since You have spoken to Your servant to Your servant; for I am slow of speech and slow of tongue.’  The Lord said to him, ‘Who has made man’s mouth? Or who makes him mute or deaf, or seeing or blind? Is it not I the Lord?  Now then go and I, even I, will be with your mouth and teach you what you are to say.’  But Moses said, ‘Please Lord now end the message by whomever You will.’  Then the anger of the Lord burned against Moses.

Moses was comfortable using the rod.  He was not comfortable using his voice.  But that’s what God told him to do.  He didn’t believe God could use his voice to perform a miracle.  (God had ‘never done that before’ – where have you heard that before?) Moses’ lack of faith in this instance had profound consequences, particularly as it was the second time in his life that he resisted using the spoken word when God commanded him to do so.

In Tune with Torah this week = The Bible teaches us that FAITH is what pleases God.  How many times have we felt prompted to do an act of kindness, to perform a godly task, to reach out to someone in need but we rationalized it away and didn’t do it?  The natural fruit of Faith is Obedience.  When we disobey the Lord, there is always a connection to our faith.  This week, let us learn from Moses that when God asks us to do something, He also gives us the grace and the ability to do it.  Let us be quick to obey, thereby demonstrating the authenticity of our Faith!

Shabbat Shalom

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