Weekly Torah Commentary — Lech Lecha October 23, 2015

Genesis 12 – 17

This week’s reading opens with the striking call of God to Abram: “Get going out from your land and from your relatives and from your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make you a great nation, to bless you, to make your name great so that you may be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, but whoever curses you I will curse and in you all the families of the earth will be blessed.” 12:1

Just imagine hearing a message from God like that! The text does not elaborate on Abram’s feelings or thoughts. It simply continues: “So Abram went, just as the Lord had spoken to him.” 12:3

He was 75 years old at the time and his wife, Sarai, was 65. Quite an undertaking at that age, don’t you think? Can you picture it?

“Sarai,” Abram says to his wife. “We’re moving.”

“Moving? Where? Why?” she replies.

“I’m not really sure, Sarai. The Almighty spoke to me and said we are to leave here and go. He’ll show us the way.” Did Sarai roll her eyes??? Would you if your husband came to you with such an announcement?? Have you ever wondered what their relatives thought?
Did they try to dissuade them? Did they think Abram was deluded, foolish, even crazy?

Sometime later after they had arrived in Canaan, God spoke again to Abram in a vision: “Do not be afraid, Abram. I am your shield, your very great reward…..He [God] took him outside and said, Look up now at the sky and count the stars if you are able to count them. Then He said to Abram, ‘So shall your descendants be.’ Then he [Abram] believed God and God reckoned it to him as righteousness.” 15:1, 5-6

To this day, Abram, whose name God changed to Abraham on another occasion, is honored as the undisputed FATHER of the chosen people, the Patriarch, the first Hebrew. He was not given the Torah, as Moses was. He was not crowned king, as David was. There was no hierarchy, no Tabernacle or Temple, no developed religious system he was charged to oversee.

He believed God and God reckoned it to him as righteousness.

FAITH was the legacy he passed on to his son, Isaac and his grandson, Jacob. FAITH sustained his great-grandson, Joseph when he was betrayed by his brothers and imprisoned on false charges. FAITH inspired a mother of the tribe of Levi to hide her infant son that he might live. FAITH motivated that son, when he was grown, to leave behind the wealth and prestige of his upbringing in Pharaoh’s court in order to identify with his own people.

For some four centuries, FAITH was the essence of the first descendants of Abraham the righteous. It was only much later that the Torah was given through Moses so that the generation of Abraham’s descendants whose FAITH was nearly obliterated by the oppression of Egypt could find their way back to the kind of relationship with God that their father Abraham had enjoyed.

Contrary to what some may think, the essence of biblical Judaism is FAITH – relationship with the Holy One of Israel expressed in uncompromising trust in His revealed Word. This in no way minimizes the importance of His Torah; it actually defines it more clearly.
The instructions in the Torah teach us HOW to express and apply our living FAITH in the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. To obey God’s commandments from a heart of FAITH is what Mt. Sinai was all about. It was FAITH that earned Abraham the right to be called Avraham Avinu, Our Father Abraham.

In Tune with Torah this week = Faith in God and love for Him motivates us to obey His commandments. Simply to follow ‘tradition’ because ‘that’s what we do’ is not Abrahamic faith; it’s religion without relationship. What God wanted with Abraham was a relationship; what God wanted with Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, David was relationship.
It’s what He wants with you, too.

Shabbat Shalom

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